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Interesting articles

Following we have prepared for you interesting articles about our methodology, our vision and values.  

Evaluation of Experiential Learning

Evaluation of experiential learning

Jerry Gosenpud, Guide to Business Gaming and Experiential Learning, 1990

Identifying and specifying outcomes of experiential learning is particularly problematic. Usually the teacher or designer of an exercise defines what is to be learned. However, the learner often learns things not intended by the designer, and often this unintended learning is more valuable because it is relevant to the learner. The problem for assessing experiential learning is that evaluation, defined by the designer, may miss the real worth of the experiential experience because what is valuable for the learner is defined by the learner and may have nothing to do with the designer’s intention....download complete article

Comfort Zone: Model or metaphor?

Comfort Zone: Model or metaphor?

Mike Brown, The University of Waikatos, 2008

..This paper explores theories from cognitive and social psychology, based on the work of Piaget and Festinger respectively, that underpin the comfort zone model. The perpetuation of this model which uses risk to promote situations of disequilibrium/dissonance does not find strong support in educational literature. It is therefore suggested that the comfort zone model be reframed as a metaphor, for possible discussion post activity, rather than being used as a model to underpin programming and pedagogy in adventure education settings....download complete article

Experiential learning

Experiential learning

Northern Illinois University, Faculty Development and Instructional Design Center 

...Learning through experience is not a new concept for the college classroom. Notable educational psychologists such as John Dewey (1859-1952), Carl Rogers (1902-1987), and David Kolb (b. 1939) have provided the groundwork of learning theories that focus on “learning through experience or “learning by doing.” Dewey popularized the concept of Experiential Education which focuses on problem solving and critical thinking rather than memorization and rote learning. Rogers considered experiential learning “significant” as compared to what he called “meaningless” cognitive learning. Kolb also noted that concrete learning experiences are critical to meaningful learning and is well known for his Learning Style Inventory (LSI) which is widely used in many disciplines today to help identify preferred ways of learning. A key element of experiential learning, therefore, is the student, and that learning takes place (the knowledge gained) as a result of being personally involved in this pedagogical approach....download complete article

Know thyself: Coaching for leadership using Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory

Know thyself: Coaching for leadership using Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory

Elizabeth Fisher Turesky & Dennis Gallagher, 2011

... We are stressing the importance of being conscious and deliberate about learning from experiences. In coaching our clients over the years, we have seen significant differences in how they learn from their experiences. As a result, we have concluded that leadership development is a highly indi- vidualised process. Nevertheless, these indi- vidual differences tend to fall into patterns approximating Kolb’s four modes. Extra- polating from Kolb’s experiential learning theory, we posit leadership development as a holistic process of adaptation to the world. Truly effective leaders are able to rely on the four learning modes in whatever combi- nation the situation requires of them....download complete article

The Learning Way: Meta-cognitive Aspects of Experiential Learning

The Learning Way: Meta-cognitive Aspects of Experiential Learning

Alice Y. Kolb and David A. Kolb, Simulation Gaming, 2009 

...  The spiral of learning from experience described in experiential learning theory (ELT; D. Kolb, 1984) can help learners “learn how to learn.” By consciously fol- lowing a recursive cycle of experiencing, reflecting, thinking, and acting, they can increase their learning power. More fundamentally, for many, their learning ability is stifled by a “fixed” self-concept whereby they tell themselves that they can’t learn. Following “the learning way” begins with embracing the idea that “I am a learner” and continues with the development of sophisticated strategies for intentional learning based on their unique talents and the different learning challenges they face....download complete article

Leadership development: teaching versus learning

Leadership development: teaching versus learning

Robert J. Allio, 2005

Findings – Most leadership training initiatives fail to produce leaders. Typical programs teach leadership theory, concepts, and principles; they promote leadership literacy but not leadership competence. Paradoxically, however, while leadership cannot be taught, leadership can be learned. Men and women become leaders by practice, by performing deliberate acts of leadership. The primary role of a good leader (one who is competent and ethical) is to establish and reinforce values and purpose, develop vision and strategy, build community, and initiate appropriate organizational change. This behavior requires character, creativity, and compassion, core traits that cannot be acquired cognitively.

Practical implications – For those charged with the responsibility of developing leaders, the three necessary steps are to select the right candidates, create learning challenges, and provide mentoring. Those who seek to develop effective leadership training programs must first establish a metric for assessing leadership effectiveness. They must then design experiments that can establish a causal or statistically significant relationship between training initiatives and leadership competency. Evidence suggests that the most effective leadership programs will focus on building self-knowledge and skills in rhetoric and critical thinking.... download complete article

What Do We Actually Mean by Experiential Learning?

What Do We Actually Mean by Experiential Learning?

Knud Illeris, Human Resource Development Review 2007 

...The concept of “experiential learning” is used in a wide range of connec- tions and situations with a different meaning and content. It is the aim of this article to try to find a common definition or demarcation of the con- cept. First, some earlier attempts are examined. However, they are not found satisfactory, and it is claimed that to come closer to an appropriate definition, it is necessary to relate to a comprehensive and contemporary general understanding of learning and from this to try and discern which kinds of learning could be termed experiential and which could not. The article then attempts to perform this task and concludes by suggesting a definition or formulation characterizing some important features of expe- riential learning seen in contrast to nonexperiential learning....download complete article

Mindfulness and Experiential Learning

Mindfulness and Experiential Learning

By Bauback Yeganeh and David Kolb, 2009

... Over the last forty years researchers from many different theoretical perspectives have discovered that individuals develop consistent, routinized approaches to learn- ing called learning styles (Sims and Sims 2006). Of the models that have emerged, Experiential Learning Theory (ELT) has largely influenced leadership and organiza- tion development. The experiential learn- ing cycle is one of the most well-known illustrations in management education and has become the key theoretical model to express the nature of experiential learning (Cunningham, 1994). Experiential learning theory also forms some of the basis for notions of the learn- ing organization (Vince, 1998; Casey, 1993; Senge, 1990). Furthermore, organizational research and practice supports the premise that when learning is defined holistically as the basic process of human adaptation, it subsumes more specialized managerial processes such as entrepreneurial learning, strategy formulation, creativity, problem solving, decision-making, and leadership. ...download complete article